Farm Dogs

We have been blessed with some wonderful dogs through the years at Lasso the Moon Alpaca Farm. Peekay, our Rhodesian Ridgeback and Mounty, our Great Pyrenees were the only two dogs we purchased from a breeder. All of our dogs since have been from rescues or “they found us”. We love our local shelters, they do such a great job. They are very clean, no kill shelters where the dogs and cats health and well being is taken very seriously. If you are looking for a new friend, cat or dog, check out these shelters: The Mountain Shelter, Castoff Pet Rescue and Logans Pet Rescue.

The newest addition to our pack. Meet Lugg Nutt. He is probably the smartest dog we have ever had. Also quite possibly the laziest. They said he was a Great Dane mix at the shelter, but we are thinking more along the lines of Mastif or Pit. He loves people and loves the cats almost as much as he does the couch.

Pumpkin Butt (aka: Moonshine, Shiner, Shunshine, Gator face). Is with out a doubt the funniest dog we have ever adopted. He is a real piece of work. Always has to have the last word. Such a loud mouthed love bug, this one!

Worm is a very regal Plott hound mix. We adopted him from the
The Mountain Sheltersoon after our Ridgebacks passed. He reminds us so much of Peekay in his manors. A very independent thinker and a great guard dog! No rats or racoons aloud!!! The Plott hound is a breed developed in North Carolina to hunt boar.

Scrubbie was a

Castoff Pet Rescuenewspaper ad candidate that became a LMA happy hound. I came home from an alpaca auction, and my husband had adopted him while I was away. Scrub was a real misfit. Half a tongue, a hole in his skull with loose shrapnel on the other side and hardly any teeth in front. He was a happy hound with no bitter issues from whatever happened to him before he graced our lives. He loved to Scrub in Mud!

Frank
was a very special gal. Our Great Pyrenees brought her home one day and insisted we keep her. The two were inseparable. She is a cattle dog ‘blue healer’ mix. She was a fabulous dog and we are so glad she adopted us. A great guard dog and a hoot. We even invented a cocktail in her honor. The Farnk n Berry Cocktail…yummm!

Mounty
Great Pyrenees take their name from the mountain range in southwestern Europe where they long have been used as guardians of the flocks.
Mounty arrived on the farm before our alpacas, so it was inevitable that he loved being around us more then them. None the less he was a great dog and protector of our property! (He liked deer skins)

A member of the Mastiff family, as mature adults they are rather sedate. As a breed they are remarkably healthy and long lived. They have few major genetic problems and usually live to be 10-12 years old.

The Great Pyrenees combines a great intelligence with a deep devotion to family and home, and a natural-born instinct to guard and protect. They command respect as watch dogs (when you here one bark you will know why) as well as admiration as pets. Due to the cutness of the GPR puppy, many are purchased without realizing how big they get as adults, resulting in many being dumped on rescues. If you are interested in a GPR, please visit the GPR rescue and consider giving a rescue dog a chance before buying a puppy.

Peekay, Tandia & Fanny, our beloved Rhodesian Ridgebacks
A sight hound, originally from South Africa, RR’s were bred to hunt lions. They have a distinct line of hair that grows backwards down the center of their backs, like a cow came along and took a big, long lick down their back. We plan to someday have another Ridgeback grace our lives when the timing is right. T-bo, Fan and Peekay have all passed on from our lives. gone but, never forgotten. T-bo and Fanny came to us from the RR Rescue of GA.

The Rhodesian Ridgeback is a native of South Africa. This breed was developed to meet the wide-ranging needs of a hunting dog in the African veldt. The Rhodesian Ridgebacks of lore were capable of performing such diverse tasks as flushing a few partridge, pulling down a wounded stag, or guarding the farm from marauding animals and prowlers at night.
Ridgebacks were also able to withstand the rigours of the African bush. They used to hunt them in packs to separate a lion from the pride for the hunter, who was usually on horseback. Today, ridgebacks are attentive companions, devoted to their family.

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